Categories
biology imaging notes

Larva of a lamp shell

Larva of a lamp shell, also known as brachiopod.
Terebratalia transversa (Sowerby, 1846)
Oil on canvas
167.95 µm × 167.95 µm
Categories
biology notes

Brachiopod segment polarity

Paper! How are segment polarity genes expressed in an animal without segments? https://www.nature.com/articles/srep32387

Brachiopod segment polarity and the head-trunk boundary.
Categories
notes biology

Brachiopod historical hunt

Another hunt for a historical work ended successfully at @BioDivLibrary 🙂

Historical hunt for historical literature on brachiopods.
Categories
biology notes science

Brachiopods and Japanese art

Morse 1902 - Observations on living Brachiopoda. Brachiopods and Japanese art.

I visited Japan solely for the purpose of studying the Brachiopoda of the Japanese seas, and this step led to my accepting the chair of zoology in the Imperial University at Tokyo. Gradually I was drawn away from my zoological work, into archaeological investigations, by the alluring problem of the ethnic affinities of the Japanese race. The fascinating character of Japanese art led to a study, first of the prehistoric and early pottery of the Japanese, and then to the collection and study of the fictile art of Japan. Inexorable fate finally entangled me for twenty years in a minute study of Japanese pottery. The results of this work are embodied in the Catalogue of Japanese Pottery, lately published by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. With this work off my hands, I turned back with eagerness to my early studies of the Brachiopoda (…) Japan is the home of the brachiopods.

Edward S. Morse, 1902. Observations on living Brachiopoda in Memoirs of the Boston Society of Natural History, 5(8): 313-386.

Citations from page 313, 374 and plate 41.