Categories
music articles

The Pluteus Trip

The Pluteus Trip is a music compilation that I created inspired by the life of these nifty echinoderm larvae named pluteus. It was released more than ten years ago in my (now defunct) music blog ccNeLaS.

The album is freely available at:

https://archive.org/details/ThePluteusTrip

Please find the original description below and enjoy the trip!

The Pluteus Trip front cover.
Front cover of The Pluteus Trip.

Plutei are born in the seawater. They represent a specific life stage (larva) of some marine invertebrates, the Echinoderms. Most of them are less than 1mm long, so tiny that inertial forces are dominated by viscous forces of the water.

Just imagine if air was honey and we had to go for a walk… Plutei can swim and feed in this environment using their long arms and cilia. However, Plutei are ephemeral. They swim (and eat) for weeks or maybe months, before something else takes place.

Currents can take them really far away from the place they were born. Millions of Plutei are born at once. How many would survive? How many would be thousands of miles away? How many would get proper food and not be eaten?

Plutei carry the tissue of adults inside them. The food they eat goes to adult tissues. In the end, the adult in formation takes over the larval body and the Pluteus is gone.

Plutei are part of the ocean’s hidden life. Organisms we can’t see easily, but that certainly got in between our toes when walking along the beach, or were swallowed during a swim…

The Pluteus Trip back cover.
Back cover of The Pluteus Trip with the song list.
Categories
imaging biology notes

The surface of a brachiopod embryo

Brachiopod embryo showing its surface and blastopore.
Embryo of the brachiopod Novocrania anomala at the gastrula stage showing its outer surface and the blastopore at the bottom. Cell membranes were stained (F-actin) and the original image stack was converted to a 3D animation using Fiji/ImageJ.
Categories
imaging notes

A typical lightsheet microscopy session

Here is how a typical session of imaging embryos under Lightsheet Microscopy goes. A glimpse into my day-to-day work :)

Assemble the incubation chamber:

Collect and mount the embryos:

Typical lightsheet microscopy session.

Acquire a short timelapse from multiple angles:

Transfer (lots of) data for image processing ;)

File transfer
Categories
notes science

Interview for the Portrait of Science

Recently, I had the honor to be interviewed for the Portrait of Science. It’s a beautiful project created by Magdalena Gonciarz to get to know the people who do science (aka the scientists). Check out the project’s Facebook page!

Bruno C. Vellutini
Photo by Magdalena Gonciarz.
Categories
biology imaging notes

The pelagosphera larva of Sipuncula

The pelagosphera larva of #Sipuncula. Photo by Alvaro Migotto via @cifonauta http://cifonauta.cebimar.usp.br/photo/10874/

Pelagosphera larva of Sipuncula
Categories
biology imaging notes

A beautiful nemertean

The ribbon worm Tubulanus #WormWednesday #Nemertea

The nemertean Tubulanus.
Adult specimen of the nemertean Tubulanus annulatus collected in Norway.
Categories
imaging biology notes

Eye imaginal disc of Drosophila

The eye imaginal disc of Drosophila (blue=elav, pink=repo, yellow=hrp) prepared with @Bugs_and_Slugs @ZVavrusova @zeiss_micro #embryo2017

Eye imaginal disc of Drosophila.
Categories
imaging biology notes

Zebrafish laser eyes

Zebrafish embryo with laser eyes! A transgenic line for the gene Prox1 (orange) imaged with @zeiss_micro #embryo2017

Zebrafish laser eyes
Categories
biology notes

The most important problem in biology

Heading to #embryo2017 today! Wondering how long will Conklin’s words remain current… (120 years and counting)

The most important problem in biology according to Conklin.
Categories
biology notes

Understanding the evolution of cleavage patterns in early embryonic development

Video summary about our work on bryozoan development and the evolution of cleavage patterns published in BMC Biology!

The video was produced by Research Square. Also available on Vimeo.