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The PostdocNet website

Sometime ago I created a new logo for the PostdocNet, the network of postdocs of the Max Planck Society. The next step was re-designing their website… but then came 2020!

PostdocNet website
The new landing page for http://www.postdocnet.mpg.de/

Despite the challenging year, the website recently went live! I hope people enjoy the new visuals and I’m happy to have contributed to the PostdocNet 🙂

Categories
biology imaging notes

The blastopore of bryozoan embryos

This is a bryozoan embryo exhibiting its blastopore. These animals are discreet but ubiquitous in oceans and lakes all over the world.

Bryozoan embryo during gastrulation revealing its blastopore.
Embryo of the bryozoan Membranipora membranacea under confocal microscopy.

What we see is the DNA inside the nucleus of the cells of the embryo. The color gradient indicates if the nuclei are closer (yellow) or further away (purple) from the microscope camera.

The embryonic cells are arranged in a circle and form a central opening that we call the blastopore. This opening, in bryozoans, will become the mouth of the animal after the embryo develops.

You can follow the process on video or learn more details in the paper.

What about our mouth, where does it come from?

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Convert video to animated GIF

Something that I began doing more often is converting videos of developing embryos or marine invertebrates to animated GIFs. But how to do this conversion without affecting the quality of the video?

A jellyfish moving its tentacles. Source: Cifonauta.

Some time ago I found this guide to convert videos to high-quality animated GIFs using the tool FFmpeg. The trick is to generate a color palette based on the original video to improve the color quality of the GIF. Based on this guide I created a small bash script to make my life easier and perhaps yours too 😉

Check it in https://github.com/nelas/gif.sh

Categories
notes biology

Living entoprocts

Live footage of entoprocts! Tiny colonial invertebrates that capture food with a crown of ciliated tentacles

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notes code

The PostdocNet logo

The PostdocNet is an organization that represents the collective of postdoctoral researchers working in the Max Planck institutes spread throughout Germany.

The network is relatively recent, only founded in 2019, but has already put forward important proposals to improve the working conditions and career development of postdocs.

A few months ago they contacted me to help re-design their logo and website to better represent the identity of the organization. Since I enjoy creating websites and I’m sympathetic to the mission (disclaimer: I’m a postdoc) – I accepted the challenge 🙂

After some rounds of feedback from the PostdocNet working groups, the final version of the logo is finally here:

The new PostdocNet logo.

You can read more about the story behind it here.

Now the website is next…

Categories
biology notes

Cifonauta’s 8th anniversary

Cifonauta, our image database for marine biology is 8 years old today! Almost 12k photos and videos annotated with species names, geolocation, habitat, life mode, microscopy technique and more.

Visit: http://cifonauta.cebimar.usp.br Follow: @cifonauta

Cifonauta 8th anniversary
Categories
biology imaging notes

Chubby ribbon worm

A chubby ribbon worm juvenile #Nemertean #WormWednesday

Chubby ribbon worm
Juvenile specimen of the nemertean Lineus ruber under wide field fluorescence microscopy. Magenta: Nuclei; Green: F-actin.

Categories
science notes

Fly Station

Fly Station is ready for the #LNdWDD @mpicbg

Fly station.
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biology imaging notes

Larva of a lamp shell

Larva of a lamp shell, also known as brachiopod.
Terebratalia transversa (Sowerby, 1846)
Oil on canvas
167.95 µm × 167.95 µm
Categories
biology imaging notes

Fruit fly embryo under lightsheet microscopy

A short video that I made about the embryonic development of the likeable Drosophila, also known as fruit fly or vinegar fly, won an honorable mention in the Small World in Motion.

A single embryo imaged from four different angles.

The details on the techniques I used and the video on its full resolution are available for download and re-use on the Wikimedia Commons.